Lodges

Old Mondoro Bushcamp

Back to the bush

Old Mondoro Bushcamp

In amongst a profusion of dazzlingly luxurious lodges, Old Mondoro is refreshingly simple. The concept? To provide a thoroughly authentic and genuine bush experience in a remote and exclusive slice of the Lower Zambezi National Park. Do they manage it? Absolutely. The activities on offer are varied and designed to connect you with all the animal kingdom has to offer whilst the camp itself is a magnet for wildlife; think elephant splashing on the doorstep and hippo honking happily in the river below. And there might be a few creature comforts thrown in too…

At the lodge

The hotel

Perched on the edge of the river (literally) the main area is the perfect shady spot to admire the view and watch the wildlife go by – including visitors of the grey-trunked, four-legged variety as they plod into camp to feast on the winterthorn pods. It’s open-sided and breezy and filled with comfy wicker chairs at one end and a large dinner table at the other. And just like any good bush camp, there’s a fire pit for morning tea and evening whiskies at the front.

The rooms

Simple, relaxed and very comfortable, each reed and canvas chalet is designed to make the most of the river views (one has a view of a lagoon instead) with an open wall at the front and a private, raised game viewing deck. Beds are big enough for a family of elephants and the open-air bathrooms are a delight with super-strong power showers and bathtubs. And there’s only 4 rooms in total, so even when it’s full, the camp feels like it’s yours.

On safari

Experiences

We might be starting to sound like a broken record, but the activities here are wonderful. Start with a game drive to ease yourself into bush life before heading out on a gentle stroll through the winterthorn groves with the birds twittering overhead. In the afternoon, take to the water and drift lazily downstream in the boat or paddle yourself in a canoe if the mood takes you. There really is nothing better (or more exhilarating!) than coming eye to eye with an elephant on the water…

When to go

Lower Zambezi by month

January

Season: Wet
  • Temperatures are hot but comfortable, humidity varies throughout the month and there is a 1 in 2 chance of rain, although it usually falls at night.
  • Wildlife has spread out during this time of plenty, making game viewing a little more challenging.
  • There are many young animals around, providing high excitement amongst the predators.
  • Foliage is dense, green and in bloom drawing in droves of colourful butterflies.
  • Birding is at its peak with migrant species present and in breeding plumage.
  • Few camps are open over the wet season period.

February

Season: Wet
  • Temperatures are hot but comfortable, humidity is unpredictable and rain falls regularly but usually at night.
  • Wildlife numbers have dropped, animals are spread over a larger area, enjoying a time of plenty.
  • The recent birthing season has left plenty of young animals for the predators to chase.
  • Foliage is dense, green and in bloom drawing in droves of colourful butterflies.
  • Birding is at its peak with migrant species present and in breeding plumage.
  • Few camps are open over the wet season period.

March

Season: Wet
  • Temperatures are hot but comfortable, humidity has dropped and rain is falling only a couple of afternoons a week.
  • Wildlife has spread out during this time of plenty, making game viewing a little more challenging.
  • The birthing season is now over, although the large number of young antelope causes a stir amongst the predators.
  • Foliage is dense, green and in bloom drawing in droves of colourful butterflies.
  • High quality birding is still to be enjoyed with the foreign migrants still present.
  • Few camps are open over the wet season period.

April

Season: Wet
  • Birds migrate during this month, leaving the dry season behind them.
  • Temperatures are high but comfortable, with little to no humidity, cloudy skies and rain is still a possibility.
  • The wet season is coming to an end, with wildlife still spread out and enjoying the numerous water sources.
  • The vegetation is lush and green with wildlife in its peak condition.
  • Few camps are open over the wet season period.

May

Season: Dry
  • Day temperatures begin to cool with the onset of the dry season, rain is unlikely.
  • The wet season has come to an end, animals begin the localised migration back to the last trusted water source, the Zambezi River.
  • A great month for photography, with high sunshine hours, pristine wildlife and vegetation lush and green.
  • A great month to visit the Lower Zambezi with ideal condition and an intimate safari.
  • There is the potential for cold mornings, so have some warm clothing at the ready, just in case.

June

Season: Dry
  • Day temperatures are warm and comfortable with little to no chance of rain, potential for morning frosts.
  • Animals begin to congregate in dense numbers along the Zambezi River in late June, ushering in the peak game viewing period.
  • Many plant species begin a seasonal hibernation, improving your chances of spotting wildlife.
  • A great month for photography, with good hours of light and wildlife in pristine condition.
  • The ideal time of year for canoe safari, with moderate weather and game starting to congregate along the river.
  • Be sure to pack a warm winter jacket for the chill of early morning game drive.

July

Season: Dry
  • Day temperatures are warm and comfortable with little to no chance of rain, potential for morning frosts.
  • The trees loose their leaves and the Zambezi River becomes the last reliable water source drawing animals in from a large area, especially massive herds of buffalo.
  • This is peak game viewing season, with long hours of sunshine and good air clarity.
  • A great month for photography, with good hours of light and wildlife in pristine condition.
  • The ideal time of year for canoe safari, with moderate weather and game starting to congregate along the river.
  • Be sure to pack a warm winter jacket for the chill of early morning game drive.

August

Season: Dry
  • Day temperatures begin to heat up but are still comfortable with little to no chance of rain.
  • The trees have lost their leaves and waterholes are dry, leaving the Zambezi River as the last water source drawing animals in from far and wide.
  • This is peak game viewing season, with long hours of sunshine and good air clarity.
  • The flame creeper is in bloom, bringing life to the acacia canopy.
  • The tiger fishing season kicks off although fish can be a little sluggish.
  • Be sure to pack a warm winter jacket for the chill of early morning game drive.

September

Season: Dry
  • Temperatures are high with relative humidity, there is little chance of rain.
  • The trees have lost their leaves and waterholes are dry, leaving the Zambezi River as the last water source drawing animals in from far and wide.
  • This is peak game viewing season, with long hours of sunshine and good air clarity.
  • The Carmine bee eaters start nesting in the river banks, providing a wonderful splash of colour.
  • Tiger fishing is a highlight, keeping even the most experienced angler on the edge of their seat.
  • There is the potential for cold mornings, so have some warm clothing at the ready, just in case.

October

Season: Dry
  • Temperatures are at their hottest, with humidity reaching an all year high before the fall of the first rains, usually towards the end of the month.
  • The warthogs giving birth leading to high predator activities and exceptional game viewing until the rains break towards the end of the month.
  • If you don't mind the heat, a great time to visit with tourist numbers dropping and often interesting sightings.
  • For all those birders, the Carmine bee eaters are nesting and best viewed at this time.
  • Tiger fishing reaches its peak, providing endless hours of angling excitement.

November

Season: Wet
  • Temperatures are hot and humid for the first half of November, becoming less intense with the increase of rain throughout the month.
  • The impala give birth, providing high excitement amongst the predators, however wildlife densities drop as water sources are replenished elsewhere.
  • Vegetation and trees begin to bud with the canopies playing home to the returning migrant bird species.
  • Tiger fishing remains good until the true rains arrive towards the end of the month.
  • Many of the camps close from mid November for the emerald season.

December

Season: Wet
  • Temperatures are hot with unpredictable humidity levels and high evening rainfall is to be expected.
  • Grasses begin to lengthen, foliage thickens and animals are a little more spread out, making game viewing tricky at times.
  • This is prime birding season, with migrants present and in breeding plumage.
  • Insect numbers increase with the rain, so have that repellent at the ready.
  • Few camps are open over the wet season period.

Wildlife


The Lower Zambezi National Park lies in a large river valley with fertile soils providing the basis for a thriving ecosystem. Elephant and buffalo congregate along the river to graze along with impala, eland, zebra and more, enjoying the nutritious vegetation of the region. Lion, leopard and the spotted hyena follow the herds, hunting as they move.

Map

Customise our trips online

Change lodges, add new destinations and make our suggested trips your own.

Explore trips

Get the inside scoop on safaris and where to go in Africa

Just the good stuff in your inbox every now and again!